SaveOurDaylight: Victor Keegan’s Pledge-Petition

Street light halo (small).jpg An online pledge-petition has just been created in support of lobbying MPs for the experimental introduction of ‘daylight saving’. Twenty-first century climate change, with its requirement that we save energy wherever possible, makes the need for this proposed three-year experiment even more pressing.

I’ve timed this blog to come on-stream at a very particular point in the year – the exact date and time (in 2006, Sunday 29 October at 2 a.m.) when the clocks go back one hour for the duration of the Winter. It’s an hour when I hope I shall not be paying much attention, but also one that many of us anticipate at best with unease. The extra hour in bed tomorrow morning is great; the prospects daylight-wise from now until the end of March are not.
Rethinking daylight for the 21st Century
There are various moves afoot to keep this issue in the public eye. There’s a bill (probably about to expire) in the Lords, and just this morning (Saturday 28th October ’06) there was news that the Local Government Association has joined the Policy Studies Institute in predicting a reduction in accidents
and other unpleasant things if we moved the entire day forward by one hour throughout the year – which would mean one hour ahead of Greenwich Mean Time in the Winter, and two hours ahead (‘Double Summer Time’) for the rest of the year.
And now we have the blog-petition: SaveOurDaylight is an extension of the debate which surprises me not at all. It’s organised by Victor Keegan, who has also written a piece for The Guardian’s Comment is Free on the issue.
Mr Keegan has pledged to write to his MP about this if 50 other people sign up to do the same. My guess on the basis of the enormous interest in the ‘clocks go forward / back’ entries on this website is that he will need to be looking for his pen and paper before too long at all.
The benefits are real

Of course there are a few people in any situation for whom change brings problems, but the evidence favouring change so far is overwhelming. And that’s before we even seriously get to the environmental advantages -now critical, but not much factored in during previous examinations of the benefits of so-called ‘daylight saving’. In my books the challenges of climate change really have to be the clincher.
The petition is there to be signed. Go for it!
As I keep saying, it really is a win-win.

The full debate about BST is in the section of this website entitled BST: British Summer Time & ‘Daylight Saving’ (The Clocks Go Back & Forward)…..

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Posted on October 29, 2006, in BST: British Summer Time And 'Daylight Saving', Knowledge Ecology And Economy, Politics, Policies And Process, Sustainability As If People Mattered and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Keep your GMT. I would give anything to have lighter evenings and at the same time not waste precious daylight in the mornings while still in bed.
    There are boundless reasons why lighter evenings will increase the British quality of life and give people more exposure to precious “daylight”.
    Where else can I sign to add my voice to the increasing number of people who want a “life”??””

  2. Sure, why don’t we give up everything that makes us british and just become another suburb of Europe. while you’re at it, raise a petition to get us to stop speaking English and let’s switch to German or French, eh?
    GMT is the centre of the world’s time. GMT is part of our British heritage, it’s part of our history, it’s as British and roast dinners, the Queen and Big Ben. You can’t just do away with it because you are too lazy to get out of bed in the morning when it’s dark. If you don’t like the seasonal effect of it getting dark in the winter then sod off to the south of Spain or Greece or anywhere much closer to the equator!!

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